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BURNLEY boss Sean Dyche is adamant football should not be judged differently to other businesses when asked about Premier League clubs helping those further down the pyramid.

He said: ‘If the Premier League can do their bit to enhance the chances of other teams surviving possibly they may step in but does that mean every hedge-fund manager who is incredibly successful does that — filter down to the hedge-fund managers who are not so successful? Does it filter down from the restaurants, so the ones who are surviving can look after the ones who are not surviving?

‘You can’t just measure football on its own — there are lots of businesses out there that are making huge sums of money who could therefore protect businesses in their line of work.

‘If you are going to apply it to football, you have to apply it across the country to everyone and every business, then you have a balanced and fair look at it.’

 

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The difference is that the Premier League depends on the survival of clubs lower down. The top of the pyramid can’t exist if the base collapses. Henry Winter did a great piece of this in The Times yesterday.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/premier-league-is-already-in-debt-to-efl-so-bailing-them-out-is-the-only-choice-0l3vfk5zk

Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country’s football clubs. The Premier League elite meet tomorrow, discussing the possibility of a bailout for lower-league clubs, some of which face oblivion because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The provision of a £250 million package for EFL clubs is being portrayed as the right thing to do, a moral imperative on behalf of the wealthier members of the “football family” looking after impoverished, endangered siblings. It’s also in their interest. Premier League clubs are actually in debt to the EFL.

Some leading owners may question why they should be underwriting the losses of certain badly run clubs, why they are effectively being asked to subsidise some questionable or hopeless owners, and they have a point, but they should think of how the pyramid supports them with player development.

Putting on their boots, going back to their roots, a strong Premier League XI with EFL connections presents itself, starting with Nick Pope in goal and formerly of Charlton Athletic, Cambridge United, Aldershot Town, York City and Bury. Using a 3-5-2 system, three England centre backs would feature, comprising Joe Gomez, formerly of Charlton, Tyrone Mings of Ipswich Town and Harry Maguire, who played in the EFL with Sheffield United and Hull City (and Wigan Athletic on loan). The wing backs would be Kyle Walker from Sheffield United, then in the EFL, plus he spent time on loan at Northampton Town, and Raheem Sterling, whose career began in the Queens Park Rangers academy before Liverpool swooped. A midfield of Jordan Henderson (Sunderland), Dele Alli (MK Dons) and James Maddison (Coventry City) looks balanced. The attack would be forged of Jamie Vardy of Stocksbridge Park Steels, FC Halifax Town and Fleetwood Town alongside Callum Wilson, also of Coventry.

Many others benefited from coaching at EFL clubs, from an opportunity to put a foot on the first rung of the ladder, slowly reaching for the stars. Jordan Pickford learned his trade at Sunderland, John Stones began at Barnsley, Rob Holding started at Bolton Wanderers (and was briefly at Bury), while James Tarkowski commenced at Blackburn Rovers’ academy, then Oldham. Danny Ings was released by Southampton, played non-League then returned via Bournemouth. There are also the obvious benefits of loan experiences, frequently praised by Harry Kane, who now personally sponsors Leyton Orient’s kit, and others also grateful of minutes in the EFL, honing their craft, such as Tammy Abraham at Bristol City, Swansea City and Aston Villa, Mason Mount and Fikayo Tomori at Derby County and Rhian Brewster at Swansea. If the only language most Premier League owners understand is self-interest then they must acknowledge how vital the lower leagues are in player development. The Premier League: twinned with the EFL, inextricably linked, strengthened by the connection.

 

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1 hour ago, Jacko51 said:

The difference is that the Premier League depends on the survival of clubs lower down. The top of the pyramid can’t exist if the base collapses. Henry Winter did a great piece of this in The Times yesterday.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/premier-league-is-already-in-debt-to-efl-so-bailing-them-out-is-the-only-choice-0l3vfk5zk

Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country’s football clubs. The Premier League elite meet tomorrow, discussing the possibility of a bailout for lower-league clubs, some of which face oblivion because of the coronavirus  

 

Thank god for that, the news headline I saw yesterday, I read as the premier league clubs were meeting to discuss curtailing the season, which imo, the other 3 leagues would follow suit pretty quickly.

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2 hours ago, Jacko51 said:

The difference is that the Premier League depends on the survival of clubs lower down. The top of the pyramid can’t exist if the base collapses. Henry Winter did a great piece of this in The Times yesterday.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/premier-league-is-already-in-debt-to-efl-so-bailing-them-out-is-the-only-choice-0l3vfk5zk

Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country’s football clubs. The Premier League elite meet tomorrow, discussing the possibility of a bailout for lower-league clubs, some of which face oblivion because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The provision of a £250 million package for EFL clubs is being portrayed as the right thing to do, a moral imperative on behalf of the wealthier members of the “football family” looking after impoverished, endangered siblings. It’s also in their interest. Premier League clubs are actually in debt to the EFL.

Some leading owners may question why they should be underwriting the losses of certain badly run clubs, why they are effectively being asked to subsidise some questionable or hopeless owners, and they have a point, but they should think of how the pyramid supports them with player development.

Putting on their boots, going back to their roots, a strong Premier League XI with EFL connections presents itself, starting with Nick Pope in goal and formerly of Charlton Athletic, Cambridge United, Aldershot Town, York City and Bury. Using a 3-5-2 system, three England centre backs would feature, comprising Joe Gomez, formerly of Charlton, Tyrone Mings of Ipswich Town and Harry Maguire, who played in the EFL with Sheffield United and Hull City (and Wigan Athletic on loan). The wing backs would be Kyle Walker from Sheffield United, then in the EFL, plus he spent time on loan at Northampton Town, and Raheem Sterling, whose career began in the Queens Park Rangers academy before Liverpool swooped. A midfield of Jordan Henderson (Sunderland), Dele Alli (MK Dons) and James Maddison (Coventry City) looks balanced. The attack would be forged of Jamie Vardy of Stocksbridge Park Steels, FC Halifax Town and Fleetwood Town alongside Callum Wilson, also of Coventry.

Many others benefited from coaching at EFL clubs, from an opportunity to put a foot on the first rung of the ladder, slowly reaching for the stars. Jordan Pickford learned his trade at Sunderland, John Stones began at Barnsley, Rob Holding started at Bolton Wanderers (and was briefly at Bury), while James Tarkowski commenced at Blackburn Rovers’ academy, then Oldham. Danny Ings was released by Southampton, played non-League then returned via Bournemouth. There are also the obvious benefits of loan experiences, frequently praised by Harry Kane, who now personally sponsors Leyton Orient’s kit, and others also grateful of minutes in the EFL, honing their craft, such as Tammy Abraham at Bristol City, Swansea City and Aston Villa, Mason Mount and Fikayo Tomori at Derby County and Rhian Brewster at Swansea. If the only language most Premier League owners understand is self-interest then they must acknowledge how vital the lower leagues are in player development. The Premier League: twinned with the EFL, inextricably linked, strengthened by the connection.

 

A bit like taking a lone from a lone shark,once there books it will be harder to break the controlling interest,it's such a pity the EFL cannot break the overrated premier League,with overpowering foreign influences, come on bt your £275 millions will be better used for english footballers in the efl, just an opinon a dream I know

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To be fair our local clubs have budgeted appropriately in the circumstances. We have sold our usual amount of season tickets and have the Shanahans to cover the shortfall. Stoke are doing what they can to stop hemorrhaging money to their ex-Premier League overpaid squad and have the Coates family to cover the shortfall. Crewe I'm guessing have a low budget and I believe the directors have a bit of cash reserves to cover any shortfall. So why should those clubs that refuse to budget appropriately have the Premier League or government cover their shortfall?

The problem is that if multiple clubs start going to the wall then that affects those clubs that have been responsible. Which is where Dyche's comments fall down. If local restaurants go out of business then it's no skin off Nando's nose. But with his hedge fund example then yeah, when the entire economy is threatened then bailouts occur and large hedge funds have to do their part to try and help prevent a massive collapse. Because you can have billions and billions but if currency because worthless then you're not much better off than anyone else.

The Premier League shouldn't just be expected to pay 20 grand a week to Championship players because of clubs being unable to fulfill their contractual obligations. Clubs that aren't run properly shouldn't just be handed more money to waste. Generous loan terms would be a sensible solution but would clubs like Sunderland set a mid League One budget for a few years and happily have big proportions of their revenue going off to repay loans that were necessary to survive the 2020-21 season? Or would they just blow it all in the 2021-22 season and write off the debt by going into administration?

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Re the Henry Winter article, I think he grossly over exagerrates the importance of the EFL to the Greed Is Good League. 

He is of course correct about the players mentioned, but these examples are now very few and far between. 

Years ago the old 1st Division would have been made up almost entirely from such players. However, nowadays you are more likely to see a player from Benin than Birmingham performing on the highest stage. 

I don't believe that the Premier League need the EFL in any way, shape or form and certainly the PL gravy train will keep on steaming ahead with or without its perceived lower ranked counterparts. 

I think that Dyche just calls it as he see's it which in my eyes is not that far wide of the mark. 

The EFL needs to find its own identity and not regard the Premier League as some shining example to aspire to. How this is achieved is the $64,000 question. 

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The Championship is like a Premier League 2 now. How it would work if the Premier League were to take the Championship off the EFL I don't know. I doubt the Premier League would hand over money to Football League clubs without expecting something in return.

I don't think a Premier League 2 would particularly be a bad thing. It couldn't be run much worse than the EFL run the Championship.

Premier League

Premier League 2

League One

League Two

League Three (National League)

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2 hours ago, RailwayRowdy said:

 

He is of course correct about the players mentioned, but these examples are now very few and far between. 

I don't believe that the Premier League need the EFL in any way, shape or form and certainly the PL gravy train will keep on steaming ahead with or without its perceived lower ranked counterparts.

 

I just looked at 1 - 11 of Burnley's squad and the vast majority either came from or benefited from loan experience at Football League teams.

I'd like to see sustained interest in the prem if there were no relegation/ promotion battles.

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9 hours ago, mr.hobblesworth said:

I'd like to see sustained interest in the prem if there were no relegation/ promotion battles.

But that is immaterial. Most of the established top tier teams will never finish in the bottom three ever again. Gone are the days of Man Utd, Spurs & Chelsea being relegated. 

All these clubs care about is dosh, dosh and possibly more dosh. Most non Premier League supporters are no longer interested in the top division and the big boys don't care who gets relegated anyway. So interest in who goes down is minimal. 

It went a long way to becoming a closed shop with the introduction of the Greed Is Good League in 1992 (Graham Kelly, bless his soul) and, as I see it, most incubants of this sham of a competition would not care if the same 20 clubs competed in it ad infinitum - as long as they were one of them and the oodles of cash kept rolling in. 

Will we ever see the likes of Carlisle being top (albeit for a very short while) of the top division again?

Draw your own conclusions. 

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There are 20 current Premier League clubs and 27 former Premier League clubs. 16 clubs are like Carlisle in that they played in the old First Division but have yet to reach the Premier League. Six of the current 20 have been there since the start in 1992, and one of those has been in the top-flight for nearly 100 years.

Bournemouth, Burnley, Wimbledon and many other small clubs have graced the Premier League. Seven different clubs have won it. Meanwhile Germany and Italy have one club matching on to nearly double figures in consecutive titles, whilst PSG have no challengers in France and Barcelona are as bad as they have been in decades but will still finish third in La Liga at the very worst.

Doesn't really seem like much of a closed shop to me.

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2 minutes ago, mr.hobblesworth said:

At one stage, I think we held the record for most years spent in the 2nd division without ever being promoted to the top one. It was something like that anyway.

I believe that we have played the most seasons in the league without ever reaching the top flight of any club. Makes you feel quite proud in a way.

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2 hours ago, mr.hobblesworth said:

At one stage, I think we held the record for most years spent in the 2nd division without ever being promoted to the top one. It was something like that anyway.

Yeah that's right. Our record will carry on until either we get in the Premier League or until Plymouth Argyle get into the Championship before us.

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On 01/10/2020 at 12:42, Wrex said:

The Championship is like a Premier League 2 now. How it would work if the Premier League were to take the Championship off the EFL I don't know. I doubt the Premier League would hand over money to Football League clubs without expecting something in return.

I don't think a Premier League 2 would particularly be a bad thing. It couldn't be run much worse than the EFL run the Championship.

Premier League

Premier League 2

League One

League Two

League Three (National League)

You've got a good point.

Money in the Championship has reached new levels,in fact thanks to Barnsley,Stoke and Sheff.Wed whose owners wealth adds up to £19.1bn this league now includes ten billionaires,with the total wealth of all twenty four clubs owners adding up to £32.7bn.

They'd certainly give most leagues in the world a run for their money?

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1 hour ago, For Us All said:

You've got a good point.

Money in the Championship has reached new levels,in fact thanks to Barnsley,Stoke and Sheff.Wed whose owners wealth adds up to £19.1bn this league now includes ten billionaires,with the total wealth of all twenty four clubs owners adding up to £32.7bn.

They'd certainly give most leagues in the world a run for their money?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_professional_sports_leagues_by_revenue

The tenth richest league in world football apparently (I'm not counting the Champions League). More money than the top-flight in Holland and Portugal, waaaay more than the SPL.

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